The development of a new cheese is much like bringing a new child into the world; it’s a process that can be carefully planned but full of surprises. It’s a labor of love for our entire company; after all, if we don’t love it, why do it?

I wish we could claim our newest cheese, St. Albans, as our unique idea, but it was Murray’s Cheese Shop in New York City who brought the concept to our doorstep. St. Albans is modeled after the French St. Marcellin, a cheese that is no longer imported into the United States. Murray’s was eager to fill the hole in their cheese case left by St. Marcellin and so, the collaboration began.

We got our hands on a St. Marcellin recipe and our team rose to the occasion – away we went. There are so many factors to consider when bringing a new cheese to market that we give ourselves up to a year for all of the trials and tweaks; we want to get it right.

The cheese had to taste great, we had to know the story behind it, and there needed to be a void in the market that the cheese will fill. This new cheese checked all of those boxes.

Murray’s called the cheese St. Marks and within one year they were selling it in their cheese kiosks at Kroger stores around the country.

After all of the effort, time and physical space we spent on Murray’s St. Marks, we agreed that a unique version of this new cheese would also join our aged cheese lineup under the Vermont Creamery name.   

The story of St. Albans is one of firsts. It is our first 100 percent cows’ milk cheese and our first to be non-GMO Certified. It takes its name from the St. Albans Coop; this was our chance to celebrate the more than 300-farmer owners of our milk and cream supplier we’ve enjoyed a longstanding partnership with.

A year ago this was all an audacious task, but worth it, because Innovation is a core value at Vermont Creamery; it is the very reason we exist, and certainly the reason we are able to grow.  

Discover fun and easy recipes for St. Albans.